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Having Enough to Eat

  • N. F. Gray
Chapter

Abstract

The food that we eat and more importantly discard creates a very large personal carbon footprint that is hugely understated or ignored by most general carbon footprint calculators. In this chapter we explore where greenhouse gases arise in the food industry and how we can significantly reduce them at both production and consumption levels. The problem of food security and scarcity are also explored.

Keywords

Supply Chain Carbon Emission Food Waste Carbon Footprint Food Price 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Further Reading

  1. Allen, D. (2009). Forgotten skills of cooking. London, England: Kyle Cathie.Google Scholar
  2. Bartholomew, M. (2013). Square metre gardening. London, England: Frances Lincoln.Google Scholar
  3. Coley, D., Howard, M., & Winter, M. (2008). Local food, food miles and carbon emissions: A comparison of farm shop and mass distribution approaches. Food Policy, 34, 150–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Defra. (2014). Food statistics handbook 2013. London, England: Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Retrieved from https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/315418/foodpocketbook-2013update-29may14.pdf
  5. FAO. (2013). Food wastage footprint impacts on natural resources: Summary report. Rome, Italy: FAO. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3347e/i3347e.pdf
  6. Gustavsson, J., Cederberg, C., Sonesson, U., van Otterdijk, R., & Meybeck, A. (2011). Global food losses and food waste: Extent, causes and prevention. Rome, Italy: FAO. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/docrep/014/mb060e/mb060e.pdf
  7. IPCC. (2007). IPCC fourth assessment report. Working group I report: The physical science basis. WG1-AR4. Geneva, Switzerland: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Published on behalf of the IPCC by Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Google Scholar
  8. IPCC. (2012). IPCC fourth assessment report. Working group I: Technical summary (Revised). Geneva, Switzerland: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Published on behalf of the IPCC by Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Google Scholar
  9. Kenny, T., & Gray, N. F. (2009). A preliminary survey of household and personal carbon dioxide emissions in Ireland. Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 29, 1–6.Google Scholar
  10. Reganold, J. P. (2012). The fruits of organic farming. Nature, 485, 176–177. Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/nature/focus/organicfarming/
  11. Saunder, C., & Barber, A. (2008). Carbon footprints, life cycle analysis, food miles: Global trade trends and market issues. Political Science, 60, 73–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Smith, D. (2008). Frugal food. London, England: Hodder & Stoughton.Google Scholar

Food Poverty and Hunger

  1. Making food poverty history: Labours Blueprint for Eliminating Food Poverty (2011)Google Scholar

Food Scarcity

  1. World Resources Institute. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.wri.org/
  2. FAO. (2008). Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/climatechange/en/
  3. IPCC. (2007). Retrieved from http://www.ipcc.ch/

Food Waste

  1. Gustavsson, J., Cederberg, C., Sonesson, U., van Otterdijk, R., & Meybeck, A. (2011). Global food losses and food waste: Extent, causes and prevention. Rome, Italy: FAO. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/docrep/014/mb060e/mb060e.pdf
  2. Gunders, D. (2012). Wasted: How America is losing up to 40 percent of its food from farm to fork. NRDC Issue Paper: 12-06-B. New York, NY: National Resources Defense Council. Retrieved from http://www.nrdc.org/food/files/wasted-food-IP.pdf
  3. FAO. (2013). Food wastage footprint impacts on natural resources: Summary report. Rome, Italy: FAO. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3347e/i3347e.pdf

Food Miles

  1. Paxton, A. (1994). The food miles report: The dangers of long-distance food transport. London, England: SAFE Alliance. Retrieved from http://www.sustainweb.org/publications/?id=191
  2. Defra. (2012). Food transport indicators to 2010. London, England: Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Retrieved from https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/138104/defra-stats-foodfarm-food-transport-statsnotice-120110.pdf

Counter View to Saving Air Miles

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. F. Gray
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for the EnvironmentTrinity College, University of DublinDublinIreland

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