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Biofuel Lifecycle Energy and Environmental Impacts: The Challenges of Co-product Allocation

Part of the Energy Systems book series (ENERGY)

Abstract

Calculations of energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts from biofuel production often allocate impacts between biofuel and its co-products by calculating that co-products substitute for other products. We illustrate the issues of co-product allocation with a case study of corn-derived ethanol, and show that the choice of allocation procedure and parameters can significantly influence the results. This is an open issue in environmental lifecycle assessment methodology; there are research opportunities to determine co-product allocation values by using data that relate co-product utilization to land use or market changes.

Keywords

  • Ethanol Production
  • Soybean Meal
  • Biofuel Production
  • International Standard Organization
  • System Expansion

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 1
Fig. 2

Notes

  1. 1.

    1 MJ = 106 Joules.

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Correspondence to Valerie M. Thomas .

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Thomas, V.M., Choi, D.G., Luo, D. (2015). Biofuel Lifecycle Energy and Environmental Impacts: The Challenges of Co-product Allocation. In: Eksioglu, S., Rebennack, S., Pardalos, P. (eds) Handbook of Bioenergy. Energy Systems. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20092-7_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20092-7_11

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