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Plant Chromosome Preparations and Staining for Light Microscopic Studies

Abstract

Chromosome preparation is a major tool in cytogenetic analysis of an organism. Chromosome changes that occur in plant populations provide us with the evolutionary history of a species. Light microscopic observations of somatic cells provide basic information regarding the number and morphological characteristics of the chromosomes of a species. Investigations of meiotic chromosomes provide information regarding the structural changes and the way in which the chromosomes and genes segregate during sexual reproduction. Over the years several staining techniques have been developed by various researchers. In this chapter, we provide some selected methods of investigation of chromosomes for light microscopy.

Keywords

  • Chromosome morphology and structure
  • Chromosome staining
  • Light microscopy
  • Mitosis
  • Meiosis

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Correspondence to Subhash C. Hiremath .

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Hiremath, S., Chinnappa, C. (2015). Plant Chromosome Preparations and Staining for Light Microscopic Studies. In: Yeung, E., Stasolla, C., Sumner, M., Huang, B. (eds) Plant Microtechniques and Protocols. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19944-3_16

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