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Motion and Interactive Control for Upper Limb Exoskeleton

  • Shane (S.Q.) XieEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics book series (STAR, volume 108)

Abstract

This chapter presents the minimum jerk trajectory planner which is developed to generate smooth trajectories for the 5-DOF upper limb exoskeleton. The minimum jerk criterion is derived from observing normal human motion and is therefore very suitable for formulating the trajectories of a rehabilitation exoskeleton. The minimum jerk criterion is first introduced using a simple point-to-point trajectory for the 1-DOF elbow joint. For the multi-DOF shoulder joint, the minimum jerk trajectory of the shoulder movement is determined and then converted to their respective exoskeleton joint trajectories. This chapter presents force-based control strategies that allow the exoskeleton to interact with and respond to the unpredictable behaviour of the user’s limb. The concept of admittance and impedance interaction method is discussed and applied to the upper limb and exoskeleton system.

Keywords

Target Position Admittance Control Impedance Control Output Torque Inertia Tensor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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