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Scleral Shell Prostheses and Prosthetic Contact Lenses

  • Keith R. Pine
  • Brian H. Sloan
  • Robert J. Jacobs

Abstract

Where an eye has been enucleated or eviscerated, the fitting of a prosthetic eye is appropriate. However, where the eyeball has become disfigured and unsightly, a scleral shell prosthesis or a prosthetic contact lens is used to mask the defect. The development of more complex vitreoretinal surgical techniques has meant that more eyes are being saved (some with useful vision and others without sight) and that more patients are spared the potential psychological trauma of eye removal. The retained eye provides a good foundation for scleral shell prostheses or prosthetic contact lenses, and these often have excellent motility.

Keywords

Contact Lens Corneal Dystrophy Dental Stone Impression Tray PMMA Shell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith R. Pine
    • 1
  • Brian H. Sloan
    • 2
  • Robert J. Jacobs
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Optometry and Vision ScienceThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.New Zealand National Eye CentreThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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