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Formalizing the Informal, Precisiating the Imprecise: How Fuzzy Logic Can Help Mathematicians and Physicists by Formalizing Their Intuitive Ideas

  • Olga Kosheleva
  • Renata Reiser
  • Vladik KreinovichEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Fuzziness and Soft Computing book series (STUDFUZZ, volume 325)

Abstract

Fuzzy methodology transforms expert ideas—formulated in terms of words from natural language—into precise rules and formulas. In this paper, we show that by applying this methodology to intuitive physical and mathematical ideas, we can get known fundamental physical equations and known mathematical techniques for solving these equations. This fact makes us confident that in the future, fuzzy techniques will help physicists and mathematicians to transform their imprecise ideas into new physical equations and new techniques for solving these equations.

Keywords

Potential Energy Membership Function Physical Quantity Exact Equation Physical Equation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation grants HRD-0734825, HRD-124212, and DUE-0926721.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olga Kosheleva
    • 1
  • Renata Reiser
    • 2
  • Vladik Kreinovich
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.University of Texas at El PasoEl PasoUSA
  2. 2.Universidade Federal de PelotasPelotasBrazil

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