Advertisement

Understanding Learning Through and for Work: Contributions from Francophone Perspectives

Chapter
Part of the Professional and Practice-based Learning book series (PPBL, volume 12)

Abstract

This chapter identifies contributions of Francophone traditions and conceptions of learning through work and learning for work and the practices deployed to understand more fully these processes of learning. It identifies and elaborates from an Anglophone perspective four distinctive qualities of the contributions within this edited monograph. These are, firstly, that there is no single or unitary Francophone tradition or conception of learning through practice. This quality is highlighted through outlining something of the diversity of what constitutes Francophone perspectives and some accounting of the origin of these distinct conceptions. The case made is that although there are cultural and linguistic traditions across the Francophone world, there are also localised historical and cultural factors that promote difference and diversity within these accounts. Secondly, and regardless, there is an emphasis across the contributions on physically, socially and personally situated activity which stands as being distinct within Francophone accounts. This situatedness goes beyond an objective analysis of work-in-action in specific physical and social contexts (actions of workers), to include the situated nature of how individuals come to engage with what is being manifested in that context (e.g. how and on what bases they act). Thirdly, there is a pattern of contributions considering not only workers as active and critical meaning-makers, but the need to account for their bodily engagement with and consequences of their work. Further, that these focuses on the personal stand as being the point of analysis in some of the contributions that make this emphasis quite distinct. Fourthly, the means for understanding and organising support for learning through work seem distinct. The two sets of qualities referred to above suggest that Francophone traditions of professional didactics and ergonomics, and in particular, the emphasis on the situation and body, seem quite culturally distinct. They seem more analogous to laboratory and encounter sessions from the Anglophone world than what would be used in that world to organise work-based learning experiences. It is these four conceptions that are discussed in terms of what they contribute to the field of work and learning.

Keywords

Psychological Injury Educational Provision Participatory Practice Workplace Experience Cultural Emphasis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Anderson, J. R. (1993). Problem solving and learning. American Psychologist, 48(1), 35–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bakhtin, M. M. (1981). The dialogic imagination. Four essays (M. Holquist, Ed.). Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
  3. Baldwin, J. M. (1894). Personality-suggestion. Psychological Review, 1, 274–279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Baumgartner, A., & Siefried, J. (2014). Error climate and the individual dealing with errors in the workplace. In C. Harteis, A. Rausch, & J. Seifried (Eds.), Discourses of professional learning: On the boundary between learning and work. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  5. Benner, P. (1982). From novice to expert. American Journal of Nursing, 82(3), 402–407.Google Scholar
  6. Benner, P. (2004). Using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice and education. Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, 24(3), 188–199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bennett, C. A. (1938). The ancestry of vocational education. In E. A. Lee (Ed.), Objectives and problems of vocational education (2nd ed., pp. 1–19). New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.Google Scholar
  8. Billett, S. (1996). Situated learning: Bridging sociocultural and cognitive theorising. Learning and Instruction, 6(3), 263–280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Billett, S. (2001a). Coparticipation at work: Affordance and engagement. In T. Fenwick (Ed.), Sociocultural perspectives on learning through work (Vol. 92). San Francisco: Jossey Bass/Wiley.Google Scholar
  10. Billett, S. (2001b). Learning through work: Workplace affordances and individual engagement. Journal of Workplace Learning, 13(5), 209–214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Billett, S. (2006). Relational interdependence between social and individual agency in work and working life. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 13(1), 53–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Billett, S. (2009a). Conceptualising learning experiences: Contributions and mediations of the social, personal and brute. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 16(1), 32–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Billett, S. (2009b). Personal epistemologies, work and learning. Educational Research Review, 4, 210–219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Billett, S. (2014). Mediating learning at work: Personal mediations of social and brute facts. In C. Harteis, A. Rausch, & J. Seifried (Eds.), Discourses on professional learning: On the boundary between learning and working (pp. 75–93). Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  15. Bourgeois, E., Allegra, J., & Mornata, C. (2015). Transmission and individuation in the workplace. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  16. Bril, B. (2015). A functional approach to action: The case of tool-use learning. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  17. Brougère, G. (2015). Learning by participating: A theoretical configuration applied to French cooperative day care centres. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  18. Bunn, S. (1999). The nomad’s apprentice: Different kinds of apprenticeship among Kyrgyz nomads in central Asia. In P. Ainely & H. Rainbird (Eds.), Apprenticeship: Towards a new paradigm of learning (pp. 74–85). London: Kogan Page.Google Scholar
  19. Cho, M. K., & Apple, M. (1998). Schooling, work and subjectivity. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 19(3), 269–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Clot, Y. (1999). La fonction psychologique du travail. Paris: Presses universitaires de France.Google Scholar
  21. Dreyfus, H. L., & Dreyfus, S. E. (1986). Mind over machine: The power of human intuition and expertise in the age of the computer. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  22. Durand, M., & Poizat, G. (2015). Work analysis and transformation of practices: An activity-centred approach of vocational education. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  23. Filliettaz, L. (2010). Interaction and miscommunication in the Swiss vocational education context: Researching vocational learning from a linguistic perspective. Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, 7(1), 27–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Filliettaz, L., de Saint-Georges, I., & Duc, B. (2010). Skiing, cheese fondue and Swiss watches: Analogical discourse in vocational training interactions. Vocations and Learning, 3(2).Google Scholar
  25. Filliettaz, L., Durand, I., & Trébert, D. (2015). Learning through verbal interactions in the workplace: The role and place of guidance in vocational education and training. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Giddens, A. (1991). Modernity and self-identity: Self and society in the late modern age. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Glaser, R. (1989). Expertise and learning: How do we think about instructional processes now that we have discovered knowledge structures? In D. Klahr & K. Kotovsky (Eds.), Complex information processing: The impact of Herbert a. Simon (pp. 289–317). Hillsdale: Erlbaum & Associates.Google Scholar
  28. Gonon, P. (2002). The dynamics of the vocational training innovation in Switzerland. Paper presented at the Towards a history of a vocational education and training (VET) in Europe in a comparative perspective, Florence.Google Scholar
  29. Gowlland, G. (2012). Learning craft skills in china: Apprenticeship and social capital in an artisan community of practice. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 43(4), 358–371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Ingold, T. (2000). The perception of the environment: Essays on livelihood, dwelling and skill. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Jordan, B. (1989). Cosmopolitical obstetrics: Some insights from the training of traditional midwives. Social Science and Medicine, 28(9), 925–944.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Kloetzer, L., Clot, Y., & Quillerou-Grivot, E. (2015). Stimulating dialogue at work: The activity clinic approach to learning and development. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  33. Lave, J. (1993). The practice of learning. In S. Chaiklin & J. Lave (Eds.), Understanding practice: Perspectives on activity and context (pp. 3–32). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Lave, J., Murtaugh, M., & de la Roche, O. (1984). The dialectic of arithmetic in grocery shopping. In B. Rogoff & J. Lave (Eds.), Everyday cognition: Its development in social context (pp. 76–94). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Lave, J., & Packer, M. (2008). Towards a social ontology of learning. In K. Nielsen, S. Brinkmann, C. Elmholdt, L. Tanggaard, P. Musaeus, & G. Kraf (Eds.), A qualitative stance (pp. 17–46). Aarhus Universitetsforlag.Google Scholar
  36. Lorino, P. (2015). Learning as transforming collective activity through dialogical inquiries. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  37. Marchand, T. H. J. (2008). Muscles, morals and mind: Craft apprenticeship and the formation of person. British Journal of Education Studies, 56(3), 245–271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Matte, F., & Cooren, F. (2015). Learning as dialogue: An ‘on-the-go’ approach to dealing with organizational tensions. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  39. Mauss, M. (1936). Notion de technique du corps. Journal de Psychologie, 3–4, 365–386.Google Scholar
  40. Mayen, P. (2015). Vocational didactics: Work, learning and conceptualization. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  41. Ouellet, S., & Vézina, N. (2015). Activity analysis and workplace training: An ergonomic perspective. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  42. Peirce, C. S. (1998). The essential Peirce (Vol. 2, The Peirce Edition Project, Ed.). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  43. Poizat, G. (2015). Learning through interaction with technical objects: From the individuality of the technical object to human individuation. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  44. Rémery, V., & Merle, V. (2014). French approaches to accreditation of prior learning: Practices and research. In T. Halttunen, M. Koivisto, & S. Billett (Eds.), Promoting, assessing, recognizing and certifying lifelong learning: International perspectives and practices (pp. 265–280). Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Rogoff, B. (1982). Integrating context and cognitive development. In M. E. Lamb & A. L. Brown (Eds.), Advances in developmental psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 125–170). Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  46. Schutz, A. (1996). Collected papers vol. 4. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Scribner, S. (1985). Vygostky’s use of history. In J. V. Wertsch (Ed.), Culture, communication and cognition: Vygotskian perspectives (pp. 119–145). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  48. Singleton, J. (1989). The Japanese folkcraft pottery apprenticeship: Cultural patterns of an educational institution. In M. W. Coy (Ed.), Apprenticeship: From theory to method and back again (pp. 13–30). New York: SUNY.Google Scholar
  49. Smith, R. (2005). Epistemological agency and the new employee. Australian Journal of Adult Learning, 45(1), 29–46.Google Scholar
  50. Smith, R. (2012). Clarifying the subject centred approach to vocational learning theory: Negotiated participation. Studies in Continuing Education, 34(2), 159–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Troger, V. (2002). Vocational training in French schools: the fragile State-employer alliance. Paper presented at the Towards a history of vocational education and training (VET) in Europe in a comparative perspective, Florence.Google Scholar
  52. Van Lehn, V. (1989). Towards a theory of impasse-driven learning. In H. Mandl & A. Lesgold (Eds.), Learning issues for intelligent tutoring systems (pp. 19–41). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  53. Veillard, L. (2015). University-corporate partnerships for designing workplace curriculum: Alternance training course in tertiary education. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  54. von Glasersfeld, E. (1987). Learning as a constructive activity. In C. Janvier (Ed.), Problems of representation in the teaching and learning of mathematics (pp. 3–17). Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  55. Webb, E. (1999). Making meaning: Language for learning. In P. Ainely & H. Rainbird (Eds.), Apprenticeship: Towards a new paradigm of learning (pp. 100–110). London: Kogan Page.Google Scholar
  56. Wegener, C. (2014a). A situated approach to VET students’ reflection processes across boundaries. Journal of Education and Work, 27(4), 454–473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Wegener, C. (2014b). Would you like a cup of coffee? using the researcher’s insider and outsider positions as a sensitizing concept. Ethnography and Education, 9(2), 153–166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Education and Professional StudiesGriffith UniversityBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Institute for CommunicationAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

Personalised recommendations