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Alopecia Areata

  • Danya Reich
  • Corinna Eleni Psomadakis
  • Bobby Buka
Chapter

Abstract

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder characterized by hair loss in one or more well-circumscribed round patches, typically on the scalp. In this disorder, auto-reactive T-cells attack hair follicles in the growth phase and disrupt the normal hair cycle. Alopecia areata is associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. There is limited evidence guiding treatment for this disorder; however, there is some success with intralesional steroid injections, topical corticosteroids, topical immunomodulators, and phototherapy. There is no cure for alopecia areata; however, those with limited disease may experience spontaneous hair regrowth.

Keywords

Alopecia areata Alopecia Hair loss Balding Bald Autoimmune Telogen effluvium Thyroiditis Hair cycle Exclamation point hairs Nail pitting Intralesional steroid Corticosteroid Immunomodulator Calcineurin inhibitor Phototherapy Pacrolimus 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danya Reich
    • 1
  • Corinna Eleni Psomadakis
    • 2
  • Bobby Buka
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Family MedicineMount Sinai School of Medicine Attending Mount Sinai Doctors/Beth Israel Medical Group-WilliamsburgBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.School of Medicine Imperial College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of DermatologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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