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Psoriasis

  • Danya Reich
  • Corinna Eleni Psomadakis
  • Bobby Buka
Chapter

Abstract

Psoriasis is a chronic, relapsing, immune-mediated condition with a strong genetic basis. Psoriasis has a number of subtypes, which are briefly discussed, each with diverse presentations. The most common subtype is plaque psoriasis, which causes erythematous plaques with overlying silvery scale to form on the extensor surfaces of the arms and legs, lower back, neck, and scalp. Psoriasis can also cause nail changes and arthritic symptoms. Topical corticosteroids are first-line therapy for controlling mild to moderate plaque psorasis. Extensive skin involvement and more severe cases may require phototherapy or treatment with a TNF-alpha inhibitor.

Keywords

Psoriasis Plaque Guttate Inverse Pustular Erythrodermic Chronic Relapsing Immune Scale Polygenic Nail changes Nail pitting Onycholysis Psoriatic arthritis HLA PASI Corticosteroid Retinoid Calcineurin inhibitor Tacrolimus Tar Phototherapy PUVA Methotrexate Biologics Adalimumab Etanercept Anti-TNF 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danya Reich
    • 1
  • Corinna Eleni Psomadakis
    • 2
  • Bobby Buka
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Family MedicineMount Sinai School of Medicine Attending Mount Sinai Doctors/Beth Israel Medical Group-WilliamsburgBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.School of Medicine Imperial College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of DermatologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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