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Dasymetric Mapping of Population Distribution in Serbia Based on Soil Sealing Degrees Layer

Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

This paper outlines a methodology used to disaggregate a census population in order to more accurately determine the population distribution over a regional area or a state scale. Data regarding population distributions are usually accessible at the level of individual census designation places and are usually mapped as aggregated polygons by the choropleth method with the assumption of a homogeneous distribution of population within a cartographic unit. In contrast, dasymetric mapping provides a more reliable view into the allocation of inhabitants, which can be of significant importance when estimating population distributions. Coupling this methodology with the GIS environment and a free open access database of soil sealing facilitates the acquisition of population surface models for human and urban geography applications.

Keywords

  • Dasymetric mapping
  • Soil sealing
  • Statistical layer

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-18407-4_12
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Notes

  1. 1.

    http://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/figures/data/urban-morphological-zones-2000-umz2000-f1v0.

  2. 2.

    http://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/data/eea-fast-track-service-precursor-on-land-monitoring-degree-of-soil-sealing.

  3. 3.

    http://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/figures/soil-sealing-in-the-capitals/explanation-of-the-methodology/download.

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Acknowledgments

The paper represents the result of research carried out on projects No. III 47014 “The role and implementation of the National spatial plan and regional development in renewal of strategic research, thinking and governance in Serbia”, TR 36036 “Sustainable spatial development of Danube area in Serbia” and TR 36035 “Spatial, ecological, energy and social aspects of settlements’ development and climate changes—interrelationships” financed by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia.

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Correspondence to Nikola Krunić .

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Krunić, N., Bajat, B., Kilibarda, M. (2015). Dasymetric Mapping of Population Distribution in Serbia Based on Soil Sealing Degrees Layer. In: Růžičková, K., Inspektor, T. (eds) Surface Models for Geosciences. Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-18407-4_12

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