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How Do Students Share and Refine Models Through Dual Modelling Teaching: The Case of Students Who Do Not Solve Independently

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Mathematical Modelling in Education Research and Practice

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is firstly to show how students who could not solve an initial task by themselves shared and refined models through dual modelling teaching, and secondly to derive suggestions for dual modelling teaching. Through examining students’ worksheets and protocols of video and audio records of the lessons, it was shown that unsuccessful modellers were able to change/modify their own models and classmates’ ones and progress their dual modelling cycle by sharing different models. One crucial point for progression in the dual modelling cycle is the sharing of various models, which the modellers could not interpret or find independently. As an intervention strategy for the progression, teachers need to encourage students to share models that are related with both the initial task and their similar one, and to ensure a variety of ways to progress.

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Correspondence to Takashi Kawakami .

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Kawakami, T., Saeki, A., Matsuzaki, A. (2015). How Do Students Share and Refine Models Through Dual Modelling Teaching: The Case of Students Who Do Not Solve Independently. In: Stillman, G., Blum, W., Salett Biembengut, M. (eds) Mathematical Modelling in Education Research and Practice. International Perspectives on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematical Modelling. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-18272-8_15

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