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Source Language Interference in English-to-Chinese Translation

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Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics 2015

Part of the book series: Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics ((YCLP,volume 3))

Abstract

Translational language as a “third code” has been found to differ from both source and target languages. Recent corpus-based studies have proposed a number of translation universal (TU) hypotheses including, for example, simplification, explicitation and normalisation. This article investigates the “source language shining through” hypothesis put forward by Teich (2003: 207) by exploring source language interference in translated texts, at both lexical and grammatical levels, in English-to-Chinese translation on the basis of comparable corpora and parallel corpora of the two languages. The evidence from the two genetically distant languages is of critical importance in generalising the source language interference as a potential translation universal.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    This example is taken from a bilingual magazine (www.taiwan-panorama.com).

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Correspondence to Richard Xiao .

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Xiao, R. (2015). Source Language Interference in English-to-Chinese Translation. In: Romero-Trillo, J. (eds) Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics 2015. Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics, vol 3. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-17948-3_7

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