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Finite Element Method for Trusses

  • Maria Augusta Neto
  • Ana Amaro
  • Luis Roseiro
  • José Cirne
  • Rogério Leal
Chapter
  • 2.9k Downloads

Abstract

A truss is a structural element that is designed to support only axial forces, therefore it deforms only in its axial direction. The cross-section of the bar can have arbitrary geometry, but its dimensions should be much smaller than the bar length. Finite element developments for truss members will be performed in this chapter. The simplest and most widely used finite element for truss structures is the well-known truss or bar finite element with two nodal points. Such kind of finite elements are applicable for analysis of skeletal type of truss structural systems both in two-dimensional and three-dimensional space. Basic concepts, procedures and formulations can also be found in a great number of existing books [1–3]. In skeletal structures consisting of truss members, the truss elements are linked by pins or hinges without any friction, so there are only forces that transmitted among bars, which means that no moments are transmitted. In the presentation of this concept it will be assumed that truss elements have uniform cross-section. These concepts can be easily extended to treat bars with varying cross-section. Moreover, from the mechanical viewpoint, there is no reason to use bars with a varying cross-section since the force in a bar is uniform.

Keywords

Shape Function Stiffness Matrix Axial Force Local Coordinate System Global Coordinate System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Bathe K-J (1996) Finite element procedures. Prentice Hall, Englewood CliffsGoogle Scholar
  2. Zienkiewicz OC, Morgan K (1983) Finite elements and approximation. Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Zienkiewicz OC, Taylor RL (2000) The finite element method. Butterworth-Heinemann, WoburnGoogle Scholar
  4. Liu GR, Quek SS (2003) The finite element method: A practical course. Butterworth-Heinemann, BurlingtonGoogle Scholar
  5. Timoshenko SP, Young DH (1965) Theory of structures. McGraw-Hill, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  6. ADINA R & D I (2014) User’s manual. R & D Inc., BostonGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Augusta Neto
    • 1
  • Ana Amaro
    • 1
  • Luis Roseiro
    • 2
  • José Cirne
    • 3
  • Rogério Leal
    • 3
  1. 1.CEMUC - Centre for Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringPolytechnic Institute of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal

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