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Introduction

  • Bernadette Walker-GibbsEmail author
  • Ann K. Schulte
Chapter
  • 874 Downloads
Part of the Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices book series (STEP, volume 14)

Abstract

The purpose of this introduction chapter is threefold. First, we provide the genesis of the concept of this book and a general overview of rural studies and self-study. Second, we describe the complexities, challenges and affordances of entwining conceptions of rurality with self-study, and finally we briefly introduce the chapters.

Keywords

Teacher Education Rural Community Teacher Preparation Rural School Academic Engagement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Kai Schafft for extensive and critical feedback on initial chapters. We owe gratitude to our authors who worked across oceans to refine and take on board our editing for the chapters. We appreciate Louise Clancy who has helped with some initial editing. We want to thank John Loughran for providing guidance and support throughout this process. We also appreciate Bernadette Ohmer and Natalie Rieborn with Springer Publishing who provided helpful support in the completion of the manuscript. Final thanks to California State University, Chico and Deakin University (in particular Jill Blackmore from the Centre for Research in Educational Futures and Innovation) who sponsored Ann’s visiting scholar opportunity in Warrnambool, Australia.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationDeakin UniversityWarrnamboolAustralia
  2. 2.School of EducationCalifornia State UniversityChicoUSA

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