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City Logistics for Sustainable and Liveable Cities

  • Eiichi TaniguchiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Greening of Industry Networks Studies book series (GINS, volume 4)

Abstract

There are many complicated and challenging urban freight transport problems which result in high logistics costs, negative environmental impacts, unsafe traffic conditions, and high energy consumption. The behaviour of the multiple stakeholders involved in urban freight transport needs to take into account for creating efficient and environmentally friendly and safe urban freight transport systems. City logistics has been proposed to achieve the goals of mobility, sustainability, and liveability by balancing the smart growth of economy and cleaner, safer and quieter environment. This chapter addresses the definition of city logistics, the driving forces of technical innovations and behaviour change of stakeholders, the governance of public sectors for providing a better framework for city logistics. The modelling techniques highlight how to describe problems and evaluate policy measures for decision support. Future perspectives relating to co-modality, home health care, and disasters are also given.

Keywords

Urban freight transport Environment ITS Public private partnerships Models 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Urban ManagementKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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