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Patterning and Functionalization of Polymeric Surfaces

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Abstract

The design of polymeric biointerfaces is crucial since interfaces are directly involved in the connection of a synthetic material and a particular biomolecule, microorganism, or cell. A large amount of work has been carried out in order to identify those aspects that need to be considered during the surface design. As a result of this effort, today it is generally admitted that parameters such as topology, surface morphology, physical structure, chemical and biological composition as well as their particular distribution on the surface play a key role on the interaction with the biological environment.

Keywords

  • Polymer Surface
  • Inkjet Printing
  • Polymer Brush
  • Polymer Interface
  • Surface Instability

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Rodríguez-Hernández, J. (2015). Patterning and Functionalization of Polymeric Surfaces. In: Rodríguez-Hernández, J., Cortajarena, A. (eds) Design of Polymeric Platforms for Selective Biorecognition. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-17061-9_2

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