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Definitions for The Fourth Dimension: A Proposed Time Classification System1

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Part of the Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science book series (DMSPAMS)

Abstract

A time classification framework has been developed and presented which includes work time, committed (obligated and non-obligated) and uncommitted (planned and unplanned) time. The taxonomy is based on a synthesis and extension of the literature on economics, socio-cultural and psychological time. The classification system, when verified, will allow for more efficient approaches to product/service pricing and distribution.

Keywords

  • Time Orientation
  • Time Allocation
  • Consumer Research
  • Household Production
  • Time Usage

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

1This research was sponsored in part by a WMU college of Business Dean’s Research Grant.

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Lane, P.M., Lindquist, J.D. (2015). Definitions for The Fourth Dimension: A Proposed Time Classification System1 . In: Bahn, K. (eds) Proceedings of the 1988 Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) Annual Conference. Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-17046-6_8

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