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The Feminist Instructional Designer: An Autoethnography

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Part of the Educational Communications and Technology: Issues and Innovations book series (ECTII)

Abstract

The following excerpts reflect a set of values and assumptions about instructional design as a scholarship and a practice. However, one of them is not like the others.

Keywords

  • Instructional Design
  • Social Power
  • Feminist Pedagogy
  • Universal Design
  • Narrative Inquiry

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Merrill, in Zemke & Rossett, 2002, 30.

  2. 2.

    Retrieved October 11, 2014, from http://www.draftcountdown.com/forum/showthread.php?s=c78d7734383302b65fea8db29ddb8676&p=1965425#post1965425

  3. 3.

    For example, US Air Force Human Resources Lab, Navy Personnel Research and Development Center, US Air Force, US Department of Defense, the Navy Project, NATO Advanced Study Institute, NATO Advanced Research Workshop.

  4. 4.

    In 2013, the median weekly earnings for women in full-time management, professional, and related occupations were $973, compared to $1,349 for men.

  5. 5.

    This may be partly because women tend to cluster in lower-paying fields. The most-educated swath of women, for example, gravitates toward the teaching and nursing fields. Men with comparable education become business executives, scientists, doctors, and lawyers—jobs that pay significantly more. Times, April 20, 2011.

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Correspondence to Katy Campbell Ph.D. .

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Campbell, K. (2015). The Feminist Instructional Designer: An Autoethnography. In: Hokanson, B., Clinton, G., Tracey, M. (eds) The Design of Learning Experience. Educational Communications and Technology: Issues and Innovations. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16504-2_16

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