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Confucianism, Chinese Families, and Academic Achievement: Exploring How Confucianism and Asian Descendant Parenting Practices Influence Children’s Academic Achievement

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Abstract

In light of the consistent Asian students PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) data results and other statistics indicating the high academic achievement of Asian descendant students, the authors take a closer look at Asian parenting and its relationships with children’s academic achievement, as well as the impact of Confucianism. The dual purpose of this chapter was to provide a conceptual framework and a follow-up qualitative study regarding the relationship between Asian descendant parenting practices, Confucianism, and children’s academic performances. Specifically, we examined the Confucianism’s influence on Chinese families’ parenting practices, including education and proper social behaviors. Confucianism is embedded in Chinese culture and places value on education at societal, familial, and individual level. We also examined Asian parenting style and its association with children’s academic achievement. In our qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted, including individual interviews and a focus group session. These methods were used to explore participants’ parenting experiences and perceptions regarding the focal topic. Based on the thematic analysis, four themes emerged. They are Confucianism Impact, Demandingness as Expectations, Responsiveness to Academics Needs and Interests, and Balance Between Expectations and Responsiveness. Discussion and implication are provided to inform the research community concerning Asian descendant families and children’s academic performance.

Keywords

  • Confucianism
  • Asian descendant parents
  • Chinese families
  • Academic achievement
  • Parental involvement
  • Parenting styles
  • Parent–child interaction

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Correspondence to Grace Hui-Chen Huang .

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Huang, G.HC., Gove, M. (2015). Confucianism, Chinese Families, and Academic Achievement: Exploring How Confucianism and Asian Descendant Parenting Practices Influence Children’s Academic Achievement. In: Khine, M. (eds) Science Education in East Asia. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16390-1_3

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