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Criminology, Terrorism, and Serendipity

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Envisioning Criminology

Abstract

I was attending a relatively uneventful Department of Homeland Security meeting several years ago, and the keynote speakers’ topic was success. I can no longer remember the speaker’s name, but I do recall that the gist of his message was that three things were essential for success: (1) get good at something, (2) be smart enough to respond when something you are good at comes along, and (3) hope for good luck. I pursued a Ph.D. with the aspiration of learning how to become a respectable social scientist. I have tried to remain open to new theories, methods, and opportunities throughout my career. And of course I have always hoped for good luck.

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LaFree, G. (2015). Criminology, Terrorism, and Serendipity. In: Maltz, M., Rice, S. (eds) Envisioning Criminology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-15868-6_12

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