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Optimizing Malaria Treatment in the Community

  • Michael Hawkes
  • Lena Serghides

Abstract

Over 200 million cases of malaria are reported annually to the WHO, including 627,000 deaths, mostly among children. These alarming figures persist although malaria is an entirely curable infection with currently available medications promptly deployed. Most malaria infections occur in resource-limited rural settings with poor access to medical care. Therefore, one of the primary challenges in optimizing antimalarial treatment is delivery of care to underserved communities. Alternative strategies to physician-guided, laboratory-assisted, diagnosis and treatment will be required in order to reach the large number of cases of uncomplicated malaria that arise in rural communities. The authors suggest that these challenges can be addressed with well-designed programs featuring training of community health workers, increased attention to supply management, and better community engagement. Models of integrated community case management, shown successful elsewhere, should be implemented in order to optimize antimalarial drug treatment for children in low-resource settings.

Keywords

Community Health Worker Artemisinin Combination Therapy Febrile Child Drug Shop Malaria RDTs 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

ACT

Artemisinin combination therapy

CCM

Community case management for malaria

CHWs

Community health workers

HRP-2

Histidine-rich protein-2

iCCM

Integrated community case management

IMCI

Integrated management of childhood illnesses

pLDH

Parasite lactate dehydrogenase

RDTs

Rapid diagnostic tests

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Toronto General Research Institute; Sandra Rotman Centre for Global HealthUniversity Health NetworkTorontoCanada

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