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The Ancient Moche of Trujillo

  • Jorge GamboaEmail author
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Archaeology book series (BRIEFSARCHAE)

Abstract

From AD 300 to 800, the societies of the North Coast of Peru adopted the monumental and portable art style now known as Moche. The Moche cultural tradition incorporated a complex system of visual communication that reproduced the worldview of the time and a plethora of human and supernatural characters. This part of the book explores how the archaeological fieldwork and the appeal of Moche art have contributed to the advancement of research on this ancient Pre-Columbian society, which has caught the attention of researchers and the general public at a level until recently reserved for the Maya, Aztec, and Incas. It is also presented a review of the archaeological research conducted at Chan Chan, the capital city of the Chimú Kingdom that ruled the North Coast from AD 1000 to 1470.

Keywords

Andes Moche Valley Moche society Huacas de Moche Ideology Cultural change Chimú society Chan Chan 

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© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universidad Nacional Santiago Antunez de MayoloHuarazPeru

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