Advertisement

Numerical Prediction Tools for Low-Frequency Sound Insulation in Lightweight Buildings

  • Juan NegreiraEmail author
  • Delphine Bard
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Lightweight wooden-framed constructions have steadily increased their market share in Sweden during the last two decades. Achieving acoustic and vibration comfort in wooden-based buildings is, however, still a challenging task. Wood is high in both strength and stiffness in relation to its weight, but its variability has repercussions on how sound propagates, this triggering sound insulation problems. Even if buildings comply with present-to-day regulations, complaints amid residents often arise due to low frequency noise, as it is outside the scope of the standards (where no analyses are performed below 50 Hz). In this investigation, laboratory acoustic sound insulation measurements carried out on a facade element according to the current standards, are intended to be reproduced and calibrated by means of the finite element method. In doing so, the first steps of a numerical predictive tool mimicking the real specimen, from 0 to 100 Hz, are presented. This will enable further research about phenomena occurring in the far low end of the frequency range, which is believed to be the cause of most nuisances reported by residents. Reliable predictive tools for addressing acoustic issues during the design phase avoid additional costs of building test prototypes and ensure a better acoustic performance.

Keywords

Lightweight Finite element method Prediction tools Low frequency noise Sound transmission 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research reported on here was funded by the Silent Spaces project, a part of the EU program Interreg IV, by the Vinnova and Formas project AkuLite and by the project Sustainable Thermal Acoustic Retrofit (S.T.A.R.). The authors very much appreciate the financial help provided.

References

  1. 1.
    Ljunggren F, Simmons C, Hagberg K (2014) Correlation between sound insulation and occupants’ perception – proposal of alternative single number rating of impact sound. Appl Acous 85:57–68CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    International Organization for Standardization ISO 717-1, Acoustics – Rating of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements – Part 1: airborne sound insulation, 1996Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    International Organization for Standardization ISO 140-3, Acoustics – Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements – Part 3: Laboratory measurements of airborne sound insulation of building elements, 1995Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    International Organization for Standardization ISO 140-3, Acoustics – Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements – Part 4: Field measurements of airborne sound insulation between rooms, 1998Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    International Organization for Standardization ISO 717-2, Acoustics – Rating of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements – Part 2: impact sound insulation, 2013Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Negreira J, Flodén O, Bard D (2012) Reflection and transmission properties of a wall-floor building element: comparison between finite element model and experimental data. In: Proceedings of acoustics Hong KongGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ottosen N, Petersson H (1992) Introduction to the finite element method. Pearson Education Ltd., HarlowzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bathe KJ (2006) Finite element procedures. Prentice Hall, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Sandberg G (1986) Finite element modelling of fluid-structure interaction (PhD thesis), Lund University, Division of Structural MechanicsGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Flodén O, Vibrations in lightweight structures – efficiency and reduction in numerical models. Lund University, Division of Structural Mechanics, 2014Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Zwikker C, Kosten CW (1949) Sound absorbing materials. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Morse PM, Ingard KU (1968) Theoretical acoustics. Princeton University Press, New JerseyGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Dassault Systèmes, Abaqus documentation, Version 6.12, 2012Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Chopra AK (1995) Dynamics of structures. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle RiverzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Hopkins C (2007) Sound insulation. Elsevier, LondonGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Hodgson M (1996) When is diffuse-field theory applicable? Appl Acoust 49(3):191–201CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Hopkins C, Turner P (2005) Field measurement of airborne sound insulation between rooms with non-siffuse sound fields at low frequencies. Appl Acoust 66(12):1339–1382CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Fothergill LC (1980) Recommendations for the measurements of sound insulation between dwellings. Appl Acoust 13:171–187CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Construction SciencesLund UniversityLundSweden

Personalised recommendations