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Managing Environmental Migration to Improve Economic and Social Outcomes in Developing Asia and Pacific

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Part of the Climate Change Management book series (CCM)

Abstract

This paper assesses that millions of persons are displaced annually in the Asia and Pacific region due to large concentrated populations residing in areas exposed to environmental risks. Some of those displaced end up becoming migrants, establishing their home in a new location. Migration influenced by environmental factors is contributing to the urbanization trend in the region. Displacement and migration are expected to increase in the coming years due to the impacts of climate change, and the increasing number of people residing in areas at risk of extreme environmental events or slow-onset phenomenon, such as rising sea levels. In addressing environmentally driven migration, a key policy aim should be to curtail the likelihood of forced displacement. “Climate proofing” of physical infrastructure and government support to vulnerable and poor populations can strengthen resilience. Although environmentally driven migration generally unfolds within a country’s borders, it can also take on an international character. For this reason, governments need to collaborate in tackling this challenge. If the threat of environmentally driven migration is properly managed and planned, benefits can accrue to migrants, host communities, and communities of origin.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Disasters
  • Displacement
  • Environment
  • Migration
  • Resilience
  • Risk
  • Urban development
  • Vulnerability

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-14938-7_7
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Notes

  1. 1.

    “Resilience” is the ability of countries, communities, businesses, and individual households to resist, absorb, recover from, and reorganize in response to natural hazard events, without jeopardizing their sustained socioeconomic advancement and development (ADB 2013b).

  2. 2.

    The figure includes weather-related events which displaced at least 100,000 people. Source: IDMC annual estimates of displacement due to disasters: http://www.internal-displacement.org/publications.

  3. 3.

    Kiribati, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

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Correspondence to Bart W. Édes .

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Édes, B.W., Gemenne, F. (2015). Managing Environmental Migration to Improve Economic and Social Outcomes in Developing Asia and Pacific. In: Leal Filho, W. (eds) Climate Change in the Asia-Pacific Region. Climate Change Management. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-14938-7_7

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