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Applying Organisational Theory in Pharmacy Practice Research

  • Shane ScahillEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter introduces the most common organisational theories that could be applied by pharmacy practice researchers. These theories can be useful for framing questions and guiding research in three distinct but overlapping domains: individual (micro-level), organisational (meso-level) and environmental (macro-level). In general, pharmacy practice researchers have not made full use of the potential of management theory. Pharmacists work within organisations that are undergoing significant environmental change. Taking a systematic approach means that a well-founded yet broad research agenda that is underpinned by organisational theory can be developed. The process of theory building and testing is also outlined in this chapter. Theory building is not as simple as people are led to believe, and there can be significant anguish in making sense of large volumes of complex dialogue. The bulk of the chapter addresses the nature of theory building and testing and provides methodological considerations for those brave enough to indulge themselves in this process.

Keywords

Pharmacy practice research Theory building Theory development Theory testing Ontology Epistemology 

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Management, Massey Business SchoolMassey UniversityAucklandNew Zealand

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