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Epidemiology and Morbidity of Lymphedema

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Abstract

Lymphedema is a common condition, affecting millions of people worldwide. Primary lymphedema due to an anomalous lymphatic system is rare, afflicting 1/100,000 individuals. Secondary lymphedema from injury to a normally developed lymphatic system is the most common cause of the disease and affects approximately 1/1,000 Americans. The two most frequent problems caused by lymphedema are decreased self-esteem and infection. Other complications include difficulty using the extremity, skin changes, and rarely malignant transformation.

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Epidemiology
  • Lymphedema
  • Morbidity

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Correspondence to Arin K. Greene M.D., M.M.Sc. .

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Greene, A.K. (2015). Epidemiology and Morbidity of Lymphedema. In: Greene, A., Slavin, S., Brorson, H. (eds) Lymphedema. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-14493-1_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-14493-1_4

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-14492-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-14493-1

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