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International Humanitarian Law

  • Renata Vaišvilienė
Chapter

Abstract

Despite the existence of the obligation to settle disputes peacefully, and the obligation to refrain from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State, armed conflicts are still a reality and in need of international regulation. International humanitarian law (IHL) is a branch of Public International Law with the purpose of limiting the use of violence in armed conflict in order to protect those who do not or no longer directly participate in hostilities and to restrict the means and methods of warfare. The main goal of armed conflict is to weaken the military potential of the enemy, which is why IHL seeks to restrict the amount of violence necessary to reach this goal. Hence, IHL is the branch of PIL that indicates not only when armed violence may be used but also how.

References

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  4. Sassòli M, Bouvier AA (2011) How does law protect in war? vol I. ICRC, GenevaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vilnius UniversityVilniusLithuania

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