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International Human Rights Law

Chapter

Abstract

The experience of the League of Nations (1919–1945) is most similar to the United Nations (UN). Indeed, the UN in its current form was shaped by two major weaknesses of the League of Nations.

References

Books and Reports

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Articles and Book Chapters

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UN Documents

  1. Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, General Comment 3, The nature of States parties’ obligations (Fifth session, 1990), U.N. Doc. E/1991/23, annex III, 4rd December 1990.Google Scholar
  2. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Manual of Operations of the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council, Geneva 2008.Google Scholar
  3. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Working with the United Nations Human Rights Programme. A Handbook for Civil Society, New York and Geneva 2008.Google Scholar
  4. Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution 2200A (XXI) of 16 December 1966 and entered into force on 23rd March 1976.Google Scholar
  5. Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, adopted on 10 December 2008 during the sixty-third session of the General Assembly by resolution A/RES/63/117 of 10 December 2008 and entered into force on 13rd May 2013.Google Scholar
  6. Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty, adopted and proclaimed by General Assembly resolution 44/128 of 15 December 1989 and entered into force on 11th July 1991.Google Scholar
  7. UN General Assembly Resolution 60/251, UN Doc A/RES/60/251, 15 March 2006.Google Scholar
  8. Vienna Declaration, Adopted by the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna on 25 June 1993 para 5., http://www.ohchr.org/EN/ProfessionalInterest/Pages/Vienna.aspx.

Further Reading

  1. Alston P, Goodman R (eds) (2012) International human rightsGoogle Scholar
  2. De Schutter O (2014) International human rights law – cases, materials, commentary, 2nd edn. AugustGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of DeustoBilbaoSpain

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