Public International Law

Chapter

Abstract

Public international law (PIL) today directly or indirectly impacts on every aspect of human life and is very much of a concern to professionals in a diverse range of specialisations, including in the field of humanitarian action. Regulations relating to human rights standards, the status of refugees, protection of victims of armed conflicts, international crimes, access to vulnerable populations in case of natural disasters, environmental matters, global communications, dispute resolution and management of interstate crises, among many others, all make up the realm of PIL. This chapter focuses on those aspects of PIL that establish the international legal framework of humanitarian action. It identifies the particular characteristics of PIL that distinguish it from national law of States, as well as the main concepts and notions it shares with all specific disciplines relevant to humanitarian action.

References

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Further Reading

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  3. Klabbers J (2015) International law. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  4. Shaw MN (2014) International law. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  5. Spieker H (2015) The legal framework of humanitarian action. In: Gibbons P, Heintze H-J (eds) The humanitarian challenge. 20 years European Network on Humanitarian Action (NOHA). Springer – NOHA, HeidelbergGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WarsawWarsawPoland

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