Advertisement

Principles and Professionalism: Towards Humanitarian Intelligence

Chapter

Abstract

Geopolitical challenges not only cause humanitarian crises; they can also be the source of failures in humanitarian action. Recent years have brought unique changes to the humanitarian landscape, from criminal and political threats, proliferation of actors in the international humanitarian sector, to professionalisation and accountability agendas imposed by international organisations and the humanitarian community itself.

References

  1. Adinolfi C, Bassiouni DS, Lauritzsen HF, Williams HR (2005) Humanitarian Response Review. Independent report commissioned by the Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), New York and Geneva, AugustGoogle Scholar
  2. Aid Worker Security Report 2013 - The new normal: coping with the kidnapping threat. Aid Worker Security Database (AWSD). Humanitarian Outcomes, 2013. http://aidworkersecurity.org/sites/default/files/AidWorkerSecurityReport_2013_web.pdf
  3. Anderson MB (1999) Do no harm: how aid can support peace or war. LondonGoogle Scholar
  4. Clarke W, Herbst J (1996) Somalia and the future of humanitarian intervention. Foreign Aff 75(2):70ffGoogle Scholar
  5. Collinson S, Elhawary S (2012) Humanitarian space: a review of trends and issues. London, http://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/7643.pdf
  6. Groupe URD (2009) Quality COMPAS companion book. Version 9.06-EN. Groupe Urgence Réhabilitation Développement, Plaisians (France). http://www.compasqualite.org/Setup/en/V9.06-EN_Quality_COMPAS_companion_book.pdf Google Scholar
  7. Guidance Note on Using the Cluster Approach to Strengthen Humanitarian Response. Interagency Standing Committee (IASC), New York, Geneva, November 24, 2006. http://www.humanitarianresponse.info/system/files/documents/files/IASC%20Guidance%20Note%20on%20using%20the%20Cluster%20Approach%20to%20Strengthen%20Humanitarian%20Response%20(November%202006).pdf
  8. Humphries V (2013) Improving humanitarian coordination: common challenges and lessons learned from the cluster approach. J Humanit Assist, April 30, http://sites.tufts.edu/jha/archives/1976
  9. Ki-Moon B, Safety and security of humanitarian personnel and protection of United Nations personnel. Report of the Secretary-General to the General Assembly, August 18, 2008Google Scholar
  10. Lancaster W (1998) The code of conduct: whose code, whose conduct? J Humanit Assist, April 18, http://jha.ac/1998/04/18/the-code-of-conduct-whose-code-whose-conduct/
  11. Macrae J, Harmer A (2003) Humanitarian action and the ‘Global War on Terror’: a review of trends and issues. HPG Report. Overseas Development Institute - Humanitarian Policy Group, JulyGoogle Scholar
  12. OCHA, What is the cluster approach? | HumanitarianResponse. http://www.humanitarianresponse.info/coordination/clusters/what-cluster-approach
  13. Pictet J (1979) The fundamental principles of the Red Cross: commentary. ICRC, January 1, http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/misc/fundamental-principles-commentary-010179.htm
  14. Prunckun H (2010) Handbook of scientific methods of inquiry for intelligence analysis. LanhamGoogle Scholar
  15. Slim H (1997) Doing the right thing: relief agencies, moral dilemmas and moral responsibility in political emergencies and war. Disasters 21(3):244–257CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Stoddard A (2009) Humanitarian firms: commercial business engagement in emergency response. In: Steets J, Hamilton DS (eds) Humanitarian assistance: improving U.S.-European cooperation. Center for Transatlantic Relations, The Johns Hopkins University/Global Public Policy Institute, Washington, pp 246–266Google Scholar
  17. Thürer D (2007) Dunant’s pyramid: thoughts on the ‘humanitarian space’. Int Rev Red Cross 89(865):47–63CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Zwitter A (2008) Humanitarian action on the battlefields of the global war on terror. J Humanit Assist (online Journal), October 25, http://sites.tufts.edu/jha/archives/223
  19. Zwitter A (2011) The United Nations legal framework of humanitarian assistance. In: Heintze H-J, Zwitter A (eds) International law and humanitarian assistance: a crosscut through legal issues pertaining to humanitarianism. Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, pp 51–69Google Scholar
  20. Zwitter A (2014) Humanitarian action, development and terrorism. In: Saul B (ed) Research handbook on international law and terrorism. Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, pp 315–332Google Scholar
  21. Zwitter A (2016) Humanitarian Intelligence: A Practitioner's Guide to Crisis Analysis and Project Design. New York, LondonGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Collinson S, Elhawary S (2012) Humanitarian space: a review of trends and issues. Overseas Development Institute - Humanitarian Policy Group, London, April, http://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/7643.pdf
  2. Humphries V (2013) Improving humanitarian coordination: common challenges and lessons learned from the cluster approach. J Humanit Assist, April 30, http://sites.tufts.edu/jha/archives/1976
  3. Slim H, Vaux T, Sandison P (2006) Key messages from ALNAP’s review of humanitarian action, Report prepared for the Active Learning Network on Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian AssistanceGoogle Scholar
  4. Stoddard A (2003) Humanitarian NGOs: challenges and trends. In: Macrae J, Harmer A (eds) HPG Report 14, humanitarian action and the ‘Global War on Terror’: a review of trends and issues. Overseas Development Institute, Humanitarian Policy Group, London, July, pp 25–35Google Scholar
  5. Rieff D (2002) Humanitarianism in crisis. Foreign Aff 81(6):111–121CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Zwitter A (2015) Big Data and International Relations. Ethics and International Affairs 29(4): 377–389Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations