The Governance of Humanitarian Action in World Politics

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces a multilevel governance approach to depict the humanitarian system and its actors. This angle of analysis is a suitable way to understand how the current international humanitarian system operates in the context of world politics. After a brief introduction to humanitarian governance and its principles and actors, this chapter explores the international political environment in which humanitarian action takes place. It goes on to discuss the humanitarian architecture, with its different types of actors, based on the conditions that motivate, enable and limit their actions against the aforementioned parameters.

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Further Reading

  1. Baylis J, Smith S (eds) (2006) The globalization of world politics: an introduction to international relations, 6th edn. Oxford University Press, Oxford, United KingdomGoogle Scholar
  2. DeMars WE, Dijkzeul D. The NGO challenge for international relations theory. Global institutions 92Google Scholar
  3. Donini A (2012) The golden fleece: manipulation and independence in humanitarian action, 1st edn. Kumarian Press, SterlingGoogle Scholar
  4. Dunant H. A Memory of SolferinoGoogle Scholar
  5. Fink G, Redaelli S (2011) Determinants of international emergency aid humanitarian need only? World Dev 39(5):741–757CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Harrell-Bond BE (1986) Imposing aid: emergency assistance to refugees. Oxford medical publications. Oxford University Press, Oxford [Oxfordshire], New YorkGoogle Scholar
  7. Heintze H-J, Thielbörger P (eds) From Cold War to cyber war: the evolution of the international law of peace and armed conflict over the last 25 yearsGoogle Scholar
  8. Kaldor M (2006) New & old wars, 2nd edn. Stanford University Press, StanfordGoogle Scholar
  9. Karns MP (2004) International organizations: the politics and processes of global governance. Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder. http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/53848373 Google Scholar
  10. Karns MP, Mingst KA (2004) International organizations: the politics and processes of global governance. Lynne Rienner Publishers, BoulderGoogle Scholar
  11. Keck ME, Sikkink K (1998) Activists beyond borders: advocacy networks in international politics. Cornell University Press, IthacaGoogle Scholar
  12. Mac Ginty R, Peterson JH (eds) (2016) Routledge companion to humanitarian action. Routledge companionsGoogle Scholar
  13. Reinalda B (ed) (2011) The Ashgate research companion to non-state actors. Ashgate research companion. Ashgate, Farnham, Surrey, England, Burlington, VTGoogle Scholar
  14. Rosenau JN, Czempiel EO (1992) Governance without government: order and change in world politics. Cambridge studies in International Relations 20. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge [England], New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Slim H (1997) Doing the right thing: relief agencies, moral dilemmas and moral responsibility in political emergencies and war. Disasters 21(3):244–257CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Weiss T. Principles, politics and humanitarian actionGoogle Scholar
  17. Walker P, Maxwell DG (2009) Shaping the humanitarian world. Routledge global institutions. Routledge, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ruhr University BochumBochumGermany

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