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Forced Migration and Refugee Settings from an Anthropological Perspective

Chapter

Abstract

In 2015, more than 65.3 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide due to conflict, disaster and insecurity, with 40.8 million people internally displaced within their own countries. This chapter explores what forced migration means from an anthropological perspective, both within the framework of humanitarian action, as well as from the perspective of affected communities.

References

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Further Reading

  1. Agier M (2002) Between war and city. Towards an urban anthropology of refugee camps. Ethnography 3(3):317–341. http://faculty.washington.edu/plape/citiesaut11/readings/Agier%20BETWEEN.pdf
  2. Bauman Z (2002) In the lowly nowherevilles of liquid modenity. Ethnography 3(3):343–349Google Scholar
  3. Colson E (2003) Forced migration and the anthropological response. J Refugee Stud 16(1). http://web.mnstate.edu/robertsb/308/forced%20migration%20and%20the%20anthropological%20response.pdf
  4. Malkki LH (2002) News from nowhere, mass displacement and globalized problems of organization. Ethnography 3(3):351–360. http://www.mcrg.ac.in/AddReading/2008/H_maalki_camps.pdf

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

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