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Armed Conflicts and Humanitarian Crises: Insights from the Anthropology of War

Chapter

Abstract

The anthropology of war covers a broad range of topics of high relevance to understand contemporary armed conflicts and humanitarian crises. Looking beyond the immediate facts of the situation and highlighting the social dimension of armed conflicts, it allows grasping the broader context in which humanitarian crises occur. Understanding war as part of the social reality of human beings and lived experiences, anthropology can offer humanitarian actors important insights into the social dimensions of war and peace. With the discipline’s comparative and holistic outlook, anthropology thus offers important insights into causes, dynamics and effects of armed conflict. This chapter provides an overview of some of the key debates and themes in the anthropology of war to contribute to the understanding of armed conflicts and humanitarian crises.

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Further Reading

  1. Otterbein K (1999) A history of research on warfare in anthropology. Am Anthropol 101:794–805Google Scholar
  2. Reyna S, Downs S (1994) Studying war: anthropological perspectives. Gordon and Breach, AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  3. Richards P (2005) No peace, no war: an anthropology of contemporary armed conflicts. Ohio University Press, AthensGoogle Scholar
  4. Robben A, Nordstrom C (1995) Fieldwork under fire: contemporary studies of violence and survival. University of California Press, BerkeleyGoogle Scholar
  5. Waterston A (2008) An anthropology of war: views from the frontline. Berghahn Books, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Otto-von-Guericke University MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  2. 2.University College DublinDublinIreland
  3. 3.Ruhr-University BochumBochumGermany

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