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Basic Concepts and Current Challenges of Public Health in Humanitarian Action

  • Siri Tellier
  • Andreas Kiaby
  • Lars Peter Nissen
  • Jonas Torp Ohlsen
  • Wilma Doedens
  • Kevin Davies
  • Dan Brun Petersen
  • Vibeke Brix Christensen
  • Niall Roche
Chapter

Abstract

A disaster is commonly defined as ‘a serious disruption of the functioning of a society, causing widespread human, material, or environmental losses, which exceed the ability of the affected society to cope using its own resources’.

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Further Reading

    Section 1

    1. Sphere Project (2011) Sphere handbook – humanitarian charter and minimum standards for disaster response. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    2. Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2009) Health cluster guide: a practical guide for country-level implementation of the health cluster. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    3. Boudreau T (2009) Solving the risk equation people-centred disaster risk assessment in Ethiopia. Humanitarian Practice Network 66. LondonGoogle Scholar
    4. UN, Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030, A/CONF.224/L.22015, 18 March 2015Google Scholar
    5. PAHO (2010) Health response to the earthquake in Haiti: lessons to be learned for the next massive sudden-onset disaster. WashingtonGoogle Scholar
    6. Brown D, Donini A (2015) Rhetoric or reality? Putting affected people at the centre of humanitarian action. ALNAP Study, LondonGoogle Scholar
    7. Alexander D (2006) Globalization of disaster: trends, problems and dilemmas. J Int Aff 59(2):1–23Google Scholar
    8. Spiegel P, Checchi F, Colombo S, Paik E (2010) Health-care needs of people affected by conflict: future trends and changing frameworks. Lancet 375:341–345CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    9. Salama P, Spiegel P, Talley L, Waldman R (2004) Lessons learned from complex emergencies over past decade. Lancet 364:1801–1813CrossRefGoogle Scholar

    Section 2

    1. Checchi F, Roberts L (2005) Interpreting and using mortality data in humanitarian emergencies: a primer for non-epidemiologists. Humanitarian Practice Network 52. LondonGoogle Scholar
    2. Tellier S (2014) Demographic profile, using secondary data, ACAPSGoogle Scholar

    Section 3

    1. Demaio A, Jamieson J, Horn R, de Courten M, Tellier S (2013) Non-communicable diseases in emergencies: a call to action. PLoS Curr 5Google Scholar
    2. Checchi F, Gayer M, Grais RF, Mills E (2007) Public health in crisis—affected populations: a practical guide for decision makers. Humanitarian Practice Network 61. LondonGoogle Scholar
    3. Véron J, Golay V (2015) Can environmental migration be measured? Popul Soc 552, ParisGoogle Scholar
    4. Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (2014) Disaster-related displacement risk: measuring the risk and assessing its drivers. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    5. Price M, Gohdes A, Ball P (2014) Updated statistical analysis of documentation of killings in the Syrian Arab RepublicGoogle Scholar
    6. Doocy S, Daniels A, Packer C, Dick A, Kirsch T (2013) The human impact of earthquakes: a historical review of events 1980–2009 and systematic literature review. PLOS Curr DisastersGoogle Scholar
    7. Guha-Sapir D, Degomme O, Phelan M (2005) Darfur: counting the deaths, mortality estimates from multiple survey data. CRED NetworkGoogle Scholar
    8. Geneva Declaration Secretariat (2008) Global burden of armed violence. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    9. UNHCR (2014) Global trends 2013. UNHCR, GenevaGoogle Scholar
    10. CRED (2013) People affected by conflict: humanitarian needs in numbers. BrusselsGoogle Scholar

    Section 4

    1. ICRC (2015) Prevention and criminal repression of rape and other forms of sexual violence during armed conflicts, pp 1–4Google Scholar
    2. ICRC (2011) Health care in danger: making the case. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    3. Danish Red Cross (2004) Handbook on the practical use of international humanitarian law. CopenhagenGoogle Scholar
    4. ICRC (2014) ICRC Q&A and Lexicon on humanitarian accessGoogle Scholar

    Section 5

    1. Michael M (2007) Global health cluster rapid health assessment guidelinesGoogle Scholar
    2. Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2012) Multi-Cluster/Sector Initial Rapid Assessment (MIRA). GenevaGoogle Scholar
    3. Olin E, von Schreeb J (2014) Funding based on needs? A study on the use of needs assessment data by a major humanitarian health assistance donor in its decisions to allocate funds. PLoS Curr DisastersGoogle Scholar
    4. Garfield R, Courtney B, Chataigner P, Walton-Ellery S (2011) Common needs assessments and humanitarian action. Humanitarian Practice Network 69. LondonGoogle Scholar

    Section 6

    1. World Health Organization (2007) Strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes: WHO’s framework for action. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    2. Bolkan H, Bash-Taqi D, Samai M, Gerdin M, von Schreeb J (2014) Ebola and indirect effects on health service function in Sierra Leone. PLoS Curr OutbreaksGoogle Scholar
    3. Munasinghe M (2007) The importance of social capital: comparing the impacts of the 2004 Asian Tsunami on Sri Lanka, and Hurricane Katrina 2005 on New Orleans, Elsevier. Ecol Econ 64:9–11CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    4. World Health Organization (2011) The Interagency Emergency Kit 2011. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    5. Lyengar P, Kerber K, Howe C, Dahn B (2015) Services for mothers and newborns during the Ebola outbreak in Liberia: the need for improvement in emergencies. PLOS Curr OutbreaksGoogle Scholar

    Section 7

    1. UN (2014) The Millennium Development Goal Report 2014. United Nations, New YorkGoogle Scholar
    2. World Health Organization (2005) Communicable disease control in emergencies: a field manual. GenevaGoogle Scholar

    Section 8

    1. Hershey C, Doocy S, Anderson J, Haskew C, Spiegel P, Moss W (2011) Incidence and risk factors for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea in children under 5 in UNHCR refugee camps: a retrospective study. Conflict Health 5Google Scholar
    2. Luquero F, Grout L, Ciglenecki I, Sakoba K, Traore B, Heile M, Diallo AA, Itama C, Page AL, Quilici ML, Mengel M, Eiros J, Serafini M, Legros D, Grais R (2014) Use of Vibrio cholerae vaccine in an outbreak in Guinea. N Engl J Med 370:2111–2120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    3. Bellos A, Mulholland K, O’Brien K, Qazi S, Gayer M, Checchi F (2010) The burden of acute respiratory infections in crisis-affected populations: a systematic review. Conflict Health 4Google Scholar

    Section 9

    1. UNFPA (2014) Standards in emergency obstetric and newborn care, http://www.unfpa.org/resources/setting-standards-emergency-obstetric-and-newborn-care
    2. Tellier S, Lund S (2014) Sexual and reproductive health and rights: agreements and disagreements - a policy brief. Working Group on Sexual and Reproductive Health. CopenhagenGoogle Scholar
    3. Tellier S, Obel J (2015) Infertility, global health mindersGoogle Scholar
    4. Vu A, Adam A, Wirtz A, Pham K, Rubenstein L, Glass N, Beyrer C, Singh S (2014) The prevalence of sexual violence among female refugees in complex humanitarian emergencies: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Curr 6Google Scholar
    5. Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2005) Guidelines for gender-based violence interventions in humanitarian settings: focusing on prevention of and response to sexual violence in emergencies. Geneva, http://www.unhcr.org/453492294.pdf
    6. Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2010) Inter-agency field manual on reproductive health in humanitarian settings. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    7. Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2010) Guidelines for addressing HIV in humanitarian settings. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    8. UNFPA (2011) Manual: inter-agency reproductive health kits for crisis situations. New YorkGoogle Scholar
    9. Onyango M, Hixson B, McNally S (2013) Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for reproductive health during emergencies: time for a new paradigm? Global Public Health 8:342–356CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    10. Chynoweth S (2015) Advancing reproductive health on the humanitarian agenda: the 2012–2014 global review. Conflict Health 9Google Scholar

    Section 10

    1. Roberts B, Patel P, McKee M (2012) Non-communicable diseases and post-conflict countries. Bull World Health Organ 90Google Scholar
    2. World Health Organization (2010) Package of essential non-communicable disease interventions of primary health care in low-resource settings. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    3. Chan E, Kim J (2011) Chronic health needs immediately after natural disasters in middle-income countries: the case of the 2008 Sichuan, China earthquake. Eur J Emerg Med 18:111–114CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    4. Spiegel P, Khalifa A, Mateen F (2014) Cancer in refugees in Jordan and Syria between 2009 and 2012: challenges and the way forward in humanitarian emergencies. Lancet Oncol 15:290–297CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    5. MSF (2014) Lebanon: treating chronic diseases among Syrian refugeesGoogle Scholar

    Section 11

    1. Mollica R, Cardozo B, Osofsky H, Raphael B, Ager A, Salama P (2004) Mental health in complex emergencies. Lancet 364:2058–2067CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    2. Inter-Agency Standing Committee (2007) IASC guidelines on mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    3. Strang A, Ager A (2003) Psychosocial interventions: some key issues facing practitioners. Intervention 1:2–12Google Scholar
    4. Hobfall S, Watson P, Bell C, Bryant R, Brymer M, Friedman MJ, Friedman M, Gersons B, de Jong J, Layne C, Maguen S, Neria Y, Norwood A, Pynoos R, Reissman D, Ruzek J, Shalev A, Soloman Z, Steinberg A, Ursano R (2009) Five essential elements of immediate and mid-term mass trauma intervention: empirical evidence. Focus Psychiatry Online 7(2):229–243Google Scholar
    5. World Health Organization (2007) Mass casualty management systems: strategies and guidelines for building health sector capacity. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    6. Chu K, Trelles M, Ford N (2010) Rethinking surgical care in conflict. Lancet 375:262–263CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Section 12

    1. Black R, Victora C, Walker S, Bhutta Z, Christian P, de Onis M, Ezzati M, Grantham-McGregor S, Katz J, Martorell R, Uauy R (2013) Maternal and child undernutrition and overweight in low-income and middle-income countries. Lancet 382:427–451CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Section 13

    1. Sanitation and Hygiene Applied Research for Equity (SHARE), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, http://www.shareresearch.org/
    2. WASH Plus–Supportive Environments For Healthy Communities, USAID, http://www.washplus.org/
    3. Bartram J, Cairncross S (2010) Hygiene, sanitation and water: the forgotten foundations of health. PLoS Med 7Google Scholar
    4. International Rescue Committee, International Water and Sanitation Centre, http://www.ircwash.org/
    5. The Global WASH Cluster: Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, http://washcluster.net/

    Section 14

    1. WHO, UNICEF, Joint Monitoring Programme, http://www.wssinfo.org (06-May-2015)
    2. Water Engineering and Development Centre, http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/, Loughborough University, http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/
    3. WaterAid, Sustainability Framework, 2011Google Scholar

    Sections 15 and 16

    1. Harvey P (2007) Excreta disposal in emergencies: a field manual, WEDCGoogle Scholar
    2. WHO, PAHO, ICRC, IFRC (2006) Management of dead bodies after disasters: a field manual for first respondersGoogle Scholar

    Section 17

    1. Kar K, Chambers R (2008) Handbook on community-led total sanitationGoogle Scholar
    2. Ferron S, Morgan J, O’Reilly M (2000) Hygiene promotion: a practical manual for relief and developmentGoogle Scholar

    Section 18

    1. World Health Organization (2006) Fuel for life: household energy and health. GenevaGoogle Scholar
    2. Davis J, Lambert R (2002) Engineering in emergencies: a practical guide for relief workers. LondonGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siri Tellier
    • 1
  • Andreas Kiaby
    • 2
  • Lars Peter Nissen
    • 3
  • Jonas Torp Ohlsen
    • 4
  • Wilma Doedens
    • 5
  • Kevin Davies
    • 6
  • Dan Brun Petersen
    • 7
  • Vibeke Brix Christensen
    • 8
  • Niall Roche
    • 9
  1. 1.University of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.DanChurchAidYangonMyanmar
  3. 3.ACAPS/University of CopenhagenGenevaSwitzerland
  4. 4.Haukeland University HospitalBergenNorway
  5. 5.United Nations Population FundPers JussyFrance
  6. 6.Danish Red CrossCopenhagenDenmark
  7. 7.Zealand University HospitalKoegeDenmark
  8. 8.Copenhagen University HospitalCopenhagenDenmark
  9. 9.Trinity College DublinDublinIreland

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