Beyond Software. Design Implications for Virtual Libraries and Platforms for Cultural Heritage from Practical Findings

  • Sander Münster
  • Nikolas Prechtel
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8740)

Abstract

3D reconstructions of passed or altered as well as 3D constructions of never existent historic artefacts, in brief intangible artefacts, are likewise results and subjects of complex socio-technical interaction. Consequently, virtual libraries and platforms supporting 3D reconstruction projects have to meet technical requirements dedicated to creation and interoperation in the same time as they have to track individual workflows and to assist scientific customs and cooperation strategies. Based on observations from various 3D reconstruction projects, this article will highlight typical phenomena and practical strategies related to data and knowledge management and suggest implications for a design of virtual libraries and platforms.

Keywords

Social Sciences Platform design Geo Sciences 3D reconstruction Virtual Libraries 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sander Münster
    • 1
  • Nikolas Prechtel
    • 2
  1. 1.Media CenterDresden University of TechnologyDresdenGermany
  2. 2.Institute of CartographyDresden University of TechnologyDresdenGermany

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