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Coping with System Failure: Why Connectivity Matters to Innovation Policy

Part of the Economic Complexity and Evolution book series (ECAE)

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with policy and the role of the European Technology Platforms as new experimental policy tools for structuring change. The problem discussed here concerns a change in the current European energy system towards a better integration of low-carbon technologies enabling it to reach its climate goals for 2020. The chapter’s research strategy stresses the importance of relations rather than the determinism of technology or ideas. As a result, the chapter’s structural analysis shows how firms in the modern European economy work, on a collective level, from within the political system to create new institutional structures in the economy. A major social network analysis examines how connectivity in two specific European ‘technology’ platforms’ networks has changed and evolved in relation to researching the solutions to solving major societal problems, and therefore has also driven innovation towards new business opportunities. The analysis shows how connectivity and network relations play an important role in innovation, as opposed to arm-length anonymous interactions as presumed in mainstream economic thinking.

Keywords

  • Innovation System
  • Social Network Analysis
  • Innovation Policy
  • Technology Policy
  • Incumbent Firm

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    http://cordis.europa.eu/technology-platforms/individual_en.html

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Acknowledgement

The author is indebted to helpful comments from discussant and participants at the 14th International Schumpeter Society Conference, 2–5 July, 2012, Brisbane, hosted by the University of Queensland, and for the valuable reports given by two anonymous referees, as well as to the editors of this special book. Remaining errors and omissions in this chapter are with the author only.

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Correspondence to Lykke Margot Ricard .

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Ricard, L.M. (2015). Coping with System Failure: Why Connectivity Matters to Innovation Policy. In: Pyka, A., Foster, J. (eds) The Evolution of Economic and Innovation Systems. Economic Complexity and Evolution. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-13299-0_12

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