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Collaborative E-Learning Framework for Creating Augmented Reality Mobile Educational Activities

  • Javier Barbadillo
  • Nagore Barrena
  • Víctor Goñi
  • Jairo R. Sánchez
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8867)

Abstract

This work introduces an Augmented Reality based framework for e-learning platforms that allows the creation of collaborative activities for mobile devices. The easy-to-use authoring tool is Web3D based and can be integrated with e-learning platforms as a plug-in resource. The Augmented Reality content can be added to a real scenario visualiser, building a sequence of scenes and events. The students can download any activity with a mobile device and play it in a multiplayer collaborative mode. The presented framework solves the problem of standard integration of Augmented Reality applications in education offering a distributed framework which is e-learning compliant.

Keywords

Augmented Reality Collaborative Learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Javier Barbadillo
    • 1
  • Nagore Barrena
    • 1
  • Víctor Goñi
    • 1
  • Jairo R. Sánchez
    • 1
  1. 1.Vicomtech-IK4Donostia-San SebastiánSpain

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