Mass Higher Education and Its Challenges for Rapidly Growing East Asian Higher Education

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides introductory discussions of the thematic issues covered in this book. This chapter discusses mass higher education from theoretical and social system perspectives. Most higher education literature that explains mass higher education does not pay much attention to these theoretical dimensions. This chapter pays special attention to that how mass higher education is related to political, economic, and societal changes. In addition, some challenges facing mass higher education are discussed. These challenges include the decoupling of teaching and research, quality of education, privatization and cost sharing, managerialism and academic freedom, and over-education and unemployment.

Keywords

Mass Higher Education East Asian Higher Education Decoupling Privatization Cost sharing Managerialism Academic freedom Over-education 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea, Republic of (South Korea)

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