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Overuse Syndromes

  • Howard A. Bird
Chapter

Abstract

Elite musicians may practise at and play their instrument for some 8 h a day, year in, year out. By athletic standards, this would be anticipated to place strain on those parts of the musculoskeletal system used, in the case of musicians mainly in the arms. Moreover, whilst instruments come in standard pre-determined size; musicians are of varying shape and size. It follows that even with adequate training in technique and sometimes the use of ergonomic aids attached to the instrument, exceptional strain can be placed on instrumentalists who are not suited to their instrument anatomically, compared to those that are. Overuse injury is accepted in sport [1] and ‘the over-training syndrome’ [2] has been intermittently fashionable. It would stretch credibility if musicians were not to be susceptible to such problems.

Keywords

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Overuse Injury Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Focal Dystonia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard A. Bird
    • 1
  1. 1.University College LondonLondonUK

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