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Pedagogical Strategies for Challenging Students’ World Views

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Social Justice Instruction

Abstract

World views are people’s theories on how the world operates and on how they feel other people should function within their visualized realities. World views are based on the endorsement of cultural norms, family values and traditions, religious beliefs, economic circumstances, education, political opinions, and the like. In teaching for social justice, educators might find students’ world views to range from being egalitarian, where democratic values might influence empathetic behavior and understanding, to being prejudiced, where feelings of intolerance might be presented in an insensitive manner. Therefore, educators must be mindful of students’ diverse world views, so as to challenge their socialized realities in a constructive manner. In this chapter, a framework for social justice teaching in institutions of higher education will be presented, not only for faculty who are vested in celebrating diversity, but for educators who are curious about supporting a vision of inclusion, equity, and justice in their classrooms.

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Correspondence to Aletha M. Harven .

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Harven, A.M., Soodjinda, D. (2016). Pedagogical Strategies for Challenging Students’ World Views. In: Papa, R., Eadens, D., Eadens, D. (eds) Social Justice Instruction. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12349-3_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12349-3_1

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