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4PEG in Action

  • Katrin Becker
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Game-Based Learning book series (AGBL)

Abstract

This section provides a detailed analysis of several games using the model described up to this point. For each game, I outline the more general analysis as described in Evaluating Games, and then proceed to a more detailed analysis of the learning potential using the Magic Bullet model.

Keywords

Instructional Design Lesson Plan Instructional Strategy Teacher Support Educational Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Resources

Resources

  1. minecraftedu.com—developer website containing resources and lesson plans to go with the educational version of Minecraft.Google Scholar
  2. physicswithportals.com—teacher maintained website containing lessons and resources for teaching physics using the puzzle room maker from Portal 2.Google Scholar
  3. teachwithportals.com—developer website containing resources and lesson plans to go with the puzzle room maker from Portal 2.Google Scholar

References

  1. Bachen, C. M., Hernández-Ramos, P. F., & Raphael, C. (2012). Simulating REAL LIVES: Promoting global empathy and interest in learning through simulation games. Simulation & Gaming, 43(4), 437–460. doi: 10.1177/1046878111432108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  3. Castaneda, L. (2014). The “Broken Rooms” Portal 2 Lesson: An Exploration of Erroneous Examples in a Classroom Setting. Foundry10, LLC. Retrieved from foundry10.org, http://foundry10.org/pdf/The%20broken%20rooms%20research%20paper.pdf.
  4. Darvasi, P. (2014). Gone Home Lessons 7 & 8: Crafting an Epic Slideshow for a Purple Basketball Revelation (Ludic Learning). Blog. Retrieved June 11, 2015, from http://www.ludiclearning.org/, http://www.ludiclearning.org/2014/08/23/gone-home-lessons-7-8-crafting-an-epic-slideshow-for-the-purple-basketball-revelation/.
  5. Jackson, J., Borden, S., O’Donnell, C., Everett, Z., Wimpey, B. J., & Costilla, V. (2012). Osy Osmosis. Retrieved June 11, 2015, from http://www.osyosmosis.com/.
  6. Lee, H. (1960). To kill a mockingbird (1st ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott.Google Scholar
  7. Merrill, M. D. (2001). First principles of instruction. Journal of Structural Learning & Intelligent Systems, 14(4), 459–466.Google Scholar
  8. Overby, A., & Jones, B. L. (2015). Virtual LEGOs: Incorporating minecraft into the art education curriculum. Art Education, 68(1), 21–27.Google Scholar
  9. Persson, M. (2015). Minecraft.Net. Retrieved June 13, 2015, from https://minecraft.net/.
  10. Pittman, C. (2013). Teaching with portals: The intersection of video games and physics education. LEARNing Landscapes, 6(2), 341.Google Scholar
  11. Scarlett, M. (2015). Gaming geography: Using Minecraft to teach essential geographic skills. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Las Vegas, NV. Retrieved March 02, 2015.Google Scholar
  12. Wernholm, M., & Vigmo, S. (2015). Capturing children’s knowledge-making dialogues in Minecraft. International Journal of Research & Method in Education, 38(3), 230–246. doi: 10.1080/1743727X.2015.1033392.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katrin Becker
    • 1
  1. 1.Mount Royal UniversityCalgaryCanada

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