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Earth Stewardship and the Biocultural Ethic: Latin American Perspectives

  • Ricardo RozziEmail author
Part of the Ecology and Ethics book series (ECET, volume 2)

Abstract

Latin America hosts a diversity of ecological worldviews and practices rooted in Amerindian cultures (e.g., Aymara, Quechua, U’wa, and Waorani) and schools of thought (e.g., geoculture, decoloniality, liberation philosophy and ecotheology) that have actual and potential value for Earth Stewardship. However, global discourses do not adequately include the diversity of languages and ethics rooted in the heterogeneous biocultural mosaic of Latin America and other regions. This is due in part to the limited inter-linguistic and inter-cultural dialogue among academics, educators, and policy makers that reside in different regions of the world. To contribute to solving this deficit, this chapter couples the conceptual frameworks of Earth stewardship and the biocultural ethic to foster: (i) inter-cultural dialogues and negotiations that fracture the current homogeneity of neoliberal global discourses through the acknowledgement and inclusion of the diversity of ecological worldviews, values, and languages, and (ii) forms of biocultural inter-species co-inhabitation embedded in the diversity of habitats and life habits. A basic principle of the biocultural ethic is that life habits are interrelated with the communities of co-in-habitants and their habitats. These “3Hs” of the biocultural ethic offer a conceptual framework that can be coupled with three terms that identify Earth Stewardship: the habitats of the Earth, the habit of stewardship, and the communities of co-inhabitants including the stewards. This coupling makes explicit the participation of diverse stewards. To better recognize the stewards’ diversity is essential to identify their differential responsibility in the genesis of global environmental change, at the same time that to visualize and value a plethora of ways of conceiving and practicing Earth stewardship.

Keywords

Biocultural Environmental justice Intercultural Liberation philosophy Traditional ecological knowledge 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Philosophy and Religion StudiesUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Ecology and BiodiversitySantiagoChile
  3. 3.Universidad de MagallanesPunta ArenasChile

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