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Hydration: Why We Drink, When to Drink, What to Drink, and How Much to Drink, That Is the Question!

Abstract

Water is the most quintessential nutrient in our body and to our life as it represents 60–70 % of our adult body weight. Water is the fluid in which all life processes occur. Water is essential to maintain the structure of our cells, aids in regulation of our body temperature, maintains our blood volume, aids in body metabolism, assists in all digestion and absorption functions, lubricates mucous membranes in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, assists in excretion of waste from bowel and kidney, the major component to digestive juices. Without it, we are not able to survive. Consuming too much water can result in water intoxication, an event that is very rare.

Keywords

  • Fluid Intake
  • Kidney Stone
  • Stone Formation
  • Orange Juice
  • Drinking Habit

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to David A. Schulsinger MD .

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Schulsinger, D.A. (2015). Hydration: Why We Drink, When to Drink, What to Drink, and How Much to Drink, That Is the Question!. In: Schulsinger, D. (eds) Kidney Stone Disease. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12105-5_25

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12105-5_25

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-12104-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-12105-5

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