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The Integrated Model for Human Service Delivery in Child Welfare

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Abstract

The present child welfare system is under attack by both conservatives and liberals alike for its fragmented system resulting in less than adequate services for the children and families it serves. Multiple weaknesses of the current social service and child welfare systems have been broadly assessed. But there has been no sustained effort to create a satisfactory system of social services to meet the needs of children and their families. There is an extraordinary convergence of increased awareness of the problem, new knowledge of what works, and new openness to change the way social services are financed, organized, and delivered. The proposed “Integrated Human Service Delivery System: Child Welfare Model” will provide an innovative approach to service delivery, which will facilitate more comprehensive and effective service delivery and better meet the needs of children and families served by our child welfare system.

The “Integrated Human Service Delivery System: Child Welfare Model” provides an innovative approach to child welfare, which facilitates comprehensive and effective service delivery. It provides solutions to the current fragmented child welfare system through a program design that utilizes a case management modality and implements state-of-the-art rapid assessment and computer technology. This allows for appropriate interventions matched to assessed deficits and improved case coordination and follow-up which will result in better meeting the needs of children and families served by the child welfare system.

Keywords

  • Service Delivery
  • Child Welfare
  • Rapid Assessment
  • Child Welfare System
  • Service Delivery System

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Marvin D. Feit .

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Feit, M., Kraus, R., Brown, A. (2015). The Integrated Model for Human Service Delivery in Child Welfare. In: Wodarski, J., Holosko, M., Feit, M. (eds) Evidence-Informed Assessment and Practice in Child Welfare. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12045-4_5

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