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Higher Education Internationalization: Why Governments Care

Abstract

Internationalization of higher education, once of interest primarily of college and university leaders, is increasingly garnering attention among government leaders and other policy makers. As globalization leads nations to become increasingly interconnected in economic, cultural, and political modalities, higher education has emerged as critical connecting point. Colleges and universities facilitate the mobility of students and scholars, serve as vehicles of public diplomacy, and support economic competitiveness. This chapter explores the ways in which colleges and universities as international actors and describes the ways in which governments engage with the internationalization of higher education.

Keywords

  • High Education
  • Foreign Direct Investment
  • International Student
  • High Education Institution
  • High Education System

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    www.globlahighered.org

  2. 2.

    http://www.arch.columbia.edu/studiox

  3. 3.

    http://web.mit.edu/misti/

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Correspondence to Jason E. Lane .

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Lane, J.E. (2015). Higher Education Internationalization: Why Governments Care. In: Ullberg, E. (eds) New Perspectives on Internationalization and Competitiveness. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11979-3_3

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