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Gender Differences in Research Scholarship Among Academics: An International Comparative Perspective

  • Jisun JungEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Changing Academy – The Changing Academic Profession in International Comparative Perspective book series (CHAC, volume 13)

Abstract

Gender issues in the academy vary from their previous backgrounds and experiences to current teaching and research activities, as well as policy agendas. The purpose of this study is to examine the differences of research scholarship between male and female academics, and to analyze these differences in terms of academic rank and academic discipline. The issues addressed regarding gender in the subsequent analysis are largely determined by themes covered in the CAP questionnaire survey. More specifically, this research investigates: (1) What are the individual and institutional profiles of male and female academics? (2) How much do male/female academics differ with respect to their research scholarship? (3) Are these gender differences common in terms of academics’ rank? (4) Does the academic discipline have an impact on the male and female academics’ research scholarship?

Keywords

Academic Discipline Research Scholarship Gender Issue Academic Rank Female Faculty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationThe University of Hong KongHong Kong SARChina

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