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Harnessing Youth Activism with/in Undergraduate Education: A Case Study of Change Lab

  • Audrey Desjardins
  • Sabrina Hauser
  • Jennifer A. McRae
  • Carlos G. A. Ormond
  • Deanna Rogers
  • David B. Zandvliet
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Discourses in Science Education book series (EDSE, volume 1)

Abstract

This report captures stories told by key stakeholders involved in the development and current offering of the Change Lab program. It attempts to honor the voices of many (but not all) of those involved in its inception including former and current students who conceived of this form of undergraduate education in the first place. These players (co-authors on this chapter) act either as leaders in the design of our experience-based, dialogue-driven project or as active participants, steering the development of future forms the program might take. Through their innovation, passion, and commitment, they provide insight into the power of dialogue and sustainability education that (in this case) is focused on the improvement of the university campus as a living lab for sustainability.

Keywords

Undergraduate Education Social Sustainability Current Student Action Competence Sustainability Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audrey Desjardins
    • 1
  • Sabrina Hauser
    • 1
  • Jennifer A. McRae
    • 1
  • Carlos G. A. Ormond
    • 1
  • Deanna Rogers
    • 1
  • David B. Zandvliet
    • 2
  1. 1.Simon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Institute for Environmental LearningSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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