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Age-Related Change of the Activity of Autonomic Nervous System Measured by Wearable Heart Rate Sensor for Long Period of Time

  • Kenichi Itao
  • Makoto Komazawa
  • Yosuke Katada
  • Kiyoshi Itao
  • Hiroyuki Kobayashi
  • Zhi Wei Luo
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 100)

Abstract

We analyzed long period of time (more than 10 h) autonomic nervous system data of 128 subjects (78 males and 50 females in 20’s, 30’s, 40’s and 50’s respectively) by using small wearable heart rate sensors. As a result, we found that there was a significant negative correlation (p value < 0.05) between LnTP (Total-Power as an indicator of comprehensive autonomic nervous system activity) and age for both sexes (genders). Moreover, the negative correlation value for male was higher than for female. The noticeable difference from the preceding study is that our research was based on data measured by many advanced wearable heart rate sensors which enabled to accumulate long period of time data in our daily life for many subjects and that we found the similar correlation between TP and aging comparing to the preceding study.

Keywords

Autonomic nervous system Heart rate sensor Aging 

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Copyright information

© Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenichi Itao
    • 1
  • Makoto Komazawa
    • 2
  • Yosuke Katada
    • 3
  • Kiyoshi Itao
    • 4
  • Hiroyuki Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Zhi Wei Luo
    • 2
  1. 1.Juntendo University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of System InformaticsKOBE UniversityKobeJapan
  3. 3.WINFrontier Co., LtdYokohamaJapan
  4. 4.Tokyo UniversityBunkyoJapan

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