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Purchase Decision Processes in the Internet Age

  • Sahar Karimi
  • K. Nadia PapamichailEmail author
  • Christopher P. Holland
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing book series (LNBIP, volume 184)

Abstract

This work explores the online purchase decision-making behaviour of consumers. It investigates how purchase decision-making processes unfold and how they vary for different groups of individuals. Drawing from the decision analysis and consumer behaviour literatures, a typology of online consumers is introduced to define four distinctive groups based on two individual characteristics: decision making style and knowledge of product. Video recordings and interviews of 55 participants have been conducted in two online settings (retail banking and mobile networks) in order to capture the purchase decision-making process. The archetypal behaviour of each typology is identified. Our results show variations in the flow of the decision-making process and process outcome for different groups.

Keywords

B2C E-commerce Online purchase decision-making processes Online shopping Decision making style Consumer prior knowledge 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank all the participants who took part in our study.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sahar Karimi
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Nadia Papamichail
    • 1
    Email author
  • Christopher P. Holland
    • 1
  1. 1.Manchester Business SchoolThe University of ManchesterManchesterUK
  2. 2.Edge Hill UniversityOrmskirkUK

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