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Fostering Community Outreach Activities for Environmental Sustainability Through a Cross-Border Academic Research Partnership

  • Mihaela SimaEmail author
  • Ines Grigorescu
  • Dan Balteanu
  • Georgi Zhelezov
Chapter
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Part of the World Sustainability Series book series (WSUSE)

Abstract

The focal aim of this study is to provide a general framework of the role of an academic research partnership in fostering community outreach activities to improve environmental sustainability through developing tailored science-society interfaces. The paper seeks to present an overview of the EU Romania—Bulgaria Cross Border Cooperation Programme project entitled “Romanian—Bulgarian cross-border joint natural and technological hazards assessment in the Danube floodplain. The Calafat-Vidin—Turnu Măgurele-Nikopole sector (ROBUHAZ-DUN)” and, particularly, the research collaboration, scientific outcomes and dissemination activities carried out during the 18 month project. The aim of the paper is to offer an example of how to promote environmental sustainability to community members in a rural transboundary area in order to respond to their needs in terms of hazard assessment and mitigation, but also to increase knowledge and awareness of disaster risk reduction, climate change and environment sustainability. A special attention was paid to the main scientific and informative products (promotional materials, maps, posters, guidebooks, university course, reports) which were used as support materials for the dissemination activities undertaken throughout the project in terms of raising awareness and informative campaigns in schools, meetings with local authorities, joint round tables, media events, summer school etc. These activities were aimed at bridging the gap between the academic research and local communities in an area prone to natural and human-induced hazards in order to support environmental sustainability through disaster risk reduction education.

Keywords

Community outreach Environmental sustainability Research partnership Cross-border cooperation Dissemination activities 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The results presented in this chapter were obtained in the framework of the project “Romanian—Bulgarian cross-border joint natural and technological hazards assessment in the Danube floodplain. The Calafat-Vidin—Turnu Măgurele-Nikopole sector (ROBUHAZ-DUN)”, funded by the Cross-border Cooperation Programme Romania-Bulgaria, MIS-ETC code 350, coordinated by the Institute of Geography, Romanian Academy.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mihaela Sima
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ines Grigorescu
    • 1
  • Dan Balteanu
    • 1
  • Georgi Zhelezov
    • 2
  1. 1.Romanian Academy, Institute of GeographyBucharestRomania
  2. 2.Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and GeographySofiaBulgaria

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